Tag Archives: Anxiety

Recovery and The Willful Pursuit of Ignorance

Ignoring it does not make it go away.

The resistance to fully acknowledge our physiological dysfunction (neurosis) is a major impediment to our recovery. Many deliberately choose to remain ignorant of the destructive capability of their dysfunction. We go to enormous lengths to remain oblivious to its symptoms, characteristics, and traits as if, by ignoring them, they don’t exist or will somehow go away. Despite these efforts, the aura of undesirability cannot be muted.

Emphasis must be placed on the importance of fully recognizing and accepting our dysfunctional idiosyncrasies and how they impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life—mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually (MBSE). Deliberate ignorance is tantamount to fixing a malfunctioning computer by ignoring the manual. This resistance, arguably justified by multiple attributions, is meant to protect us from our irrational self-beliefs, but the shield is unsustainable and counterproductive.

The attributions to resistance are correlated internal and external components. The former is implemented by the dysfunction, diagnosis, and the disruption in natural human development. External resistance is generated by the stigma triad of ignorance, prejudice, and discrimination. 

The overarching attributions to internal resistance are personal baggage, mental health stigma, and the natural physiological aversion to change. External attributions fall within the following categories, each informing the others:

  • Public opinion
  • Media misrepresentation
  • Visibility
  • Distancing
  • Diagnosis
  • Mental health stigma

Physiological Aversion. We are hard-wired to dislike change. Our bodies and brains are structured to resist anything that disrupts our equilibrium. Our nervous system monitors our metabolism, temperature, weight, and other survival functions. A new diet or exercise regimen produces physiological changes in our heart rate, metabolism, and respiration, which impact these functions. Inertia senses and resists these changes, making them difficult to maintain. Our brain’s basal ganglia resist any modification in patterns of behavior. Thus, habits like smoking or gambling are hard to break, and new undertakings (e.g., recovery), challenging to maintain.

Personal Baggage. Every physiological dysfunction and discomfort generates an emotional and behavioral identity due to childhood disturbance, and the corresponding disruption in natural human development. Most are more correlational than dissimilar and commonly comorbid. Their impact Is variable and distinguishable by human complexity. Many induce self-destructive decisions like substance abuse or emotional blackmail. Self-perceptions of incompetence, unattractiveness, and worthlessness are buttressed by guilt, blame, and shame. 

Public Opinion. Public aversion to mental illness is hard-wired. Individuals perceived as repugnant or weak in mind or body have suffered since the dawning of humankind. Psychological dysfunction and discomfort are components of natural human development. Scientific American speculates they are so common almost everyone will develop at least one diagnosable disorder at some point in their life. However, much of society views them differently because they see dysfunction in themselves, and it frightens them. That fear generates and is generated by prejudice, ignorance, and discrimination. 

Media Misrepresentation. TV, books, and films exaggerate the symptoms and traits of dysfunction, stereotyping the dysfunctional as annoying, dramatic, and peculiar. Portrayals suggest all persons impacted are unpredictable and dangerous. A 2011 comparative study revealed that nearly half of U.S. stories on mental illness explicitly mention or allude to violence. The media is powerful. Studies show homicide rates go up after televised heavyweight fights, and suicide increases after on-screen portrayals. 

Visibility is the public display of behaviors associated with dysfunctions. Not only are the recipients uneasy or repulsed by such behaviors, but the afflicted are vividly conscious of being observed, whether actual or imagined, and surrender to the GAZE―what psychoanalyst Lacan defines as the anxious state of mind that comes with scrutiny and unwanted attention.

Distancing is the public expression of contempt for the behaviors associated with dysfunction. Social distance varies, obviously, by diagnosis, but also by region, race and ethnicity, political persuasion, educational attainment, and economics. Distancing reflects the feelings a prejudiced group has towards another group; it is the affirmation of undesirability. In stigma research, the extent of social distance correlates to the level of discriminatory behavior. 

Mental Health Stigma is the hostile expression of the abject undesirability of a human being who has a mental illness. It is theinstrument that brands the dysfunctional as socially undesirable due to stereotype. The stigmatized are devalued in the eyes of others and thus in their own self-image as well. MHS is purposed to protect the general population from ‘unpredictable and dangerous’ behaviors by any means necessary. MHS is fomented by prejudice, ignorance, and discrimination. 

Diagnosis. impacted by the DSM, the disease model of mental healthcare, ignorance or ineptitude of mental health professionals, and misdiagnoses.  Diagnosis drives mental health stereotypes. Which dysfunction is the most repulsive, and which poses the most threat? People are concerned about the severity of the dysfunction, whether it is contagious, or whether the dysfunction was caused by certain behaviors. Will the symptoms worsen? Is the dysfunction punishment for sin, implying the more dangerous the symptoms, the worse the offense? Diagnosis is facilitated by the deficit disease model of mental healthcare via the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder which focuses on the history of harmful behavior.

The disease model assumes that emotional distress is merely symptomatic of biological illness. The Wellness Model of mental healthcare focuses on the positive aspects of human functioning that promote our wellbeing and recognize our essential and shared humanity. Positive psychologies and the Wellness Model emphasize what is right with us, innately powerful within us, our potential, and determination. Rather than disease and deficit, they emphasize our character strengths, virtues, and attributes. Recovery is not achieved by focusing on incompetence and weakness; it is achieved by embracing and utilizing our inherent strengths and abilities. 

Benefits of the Wellness Model

  • Revising negative and hostile language will encourage new positive perspectives
  • The self-denigrating aspects of shame will dissipate, and stigma becomes less threatening. 
  • The doctor-client knowledge exchange will value the individual over the diagnosis.
  • Realizing neurosis is a natural part of human development will generate social acceptance and accommodation. 
  • Recognizing that they bear no responsibility for onset will revise public opinion that people deserve their neurosis because it is the result of their behavior. 
  • Emphasizing character strengths and virtues will positively impact self-beliefs and image, leading to more disclosure, discussion, and recovery-remission. 
  • Realizing proximity and susceptibility will address the desire to distance and isolate. 
  • Emphasis on value and potential will encourage accountability and foster self-reliance.

Resistance closes the door to possibility. Nothing comes in, nothing goes out. Nonresistance is a prerequisite for recovery. We cannot recover if we do not consider our options. Nonresistance opens our minds and broadens our perspective. Consideration of new possibilities is rewarding and productive; resistance is counterintuitive to recovery.

Resistance v. Repression

RESISTANCE is the deliberate or unconscious attempt to prevent something from happening for any reason whatsoever. REPRESSION is a defense mechanism that prevents certain events, feelings, thoughts, and desires that the conscious mind refuses to accept from entering it. It is the ‘stuff’ that permeates our brain that we cannot address because we have compartmentalized it and misplaced the key. 

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for groups, workshops, and practicums.

Utilizing Complementarity for Social Anxiety (and other physiological dysfunctions)

Complementarity is the inherent cooperation of our human system components in maintaining physiological equilibrium. Sustainability-of-life and sustainability of our dysfunction require simultaneous mutual interaction.

How is this physiologically supported? 

Every thought and behavior generates a realignment of our neural network which produces a correlated change in our thought and behavior. Our neural network transmits the chemical and electrical maintenance that maintains our vital functions: heartbeat, nervous system, and blood–flow. It tells us when to breathe. It generates our mood, controls our weight and digestion. It provides acetylcholine for learningnoradrenaline for concentration, glutamate for memory (Mind), adrenaline for muscles, endorphins to relax (Body), dopamine for motivation, GABA for anxiety (Spirit), and serotonin for mood stabilization (Emotions).

Examples of Complementarity (Simultaneous Mutual Interaction).

  • The freeway fender bender: I could have died (mind), I’m sweating, my heart is pounding (body), I’m angry, and frustrated (emotions), and suddenly conscious of my mortality (spirit).
  • The social gathering: are they looking at me (mind), I’m shaking and sweating (body), I’m afraid I’ll say or do something stupid (emotions), and they probably won’t like me, anyway (spirit).

Mindfulness of Complementarity.

Recognizing that the “Self’ is not a single entity but a complex collective of four major components: mind, body, spirit, and emotions (“MBSE”); accepting that these components react simultaneously and work in concert. One component will seem to dominate, depending on the situation. 

How is this relevant to social anxiety?

The symptoms of social anxiety attack our self-image. Because this causes us to build up defense mechanisms, our reactions are often irrational (self-destructive). This is especially pertinent in situations where our anxiety and depression generate self-denigrating or unhealthy responses: the social event, job performance review, the interview, the classroom.

The clinical term ‘disorder’ identifies extreme or excessive impairment that negatively affects functionality. Feeling anxious or apprehensive in certain situations is normal; most individuals are nervous speaking in front of a group and anxious when pulled over on the freeway. The typical individual recognizes the ordinariness of a situation and accords it appropriate attention. The socially anxious person anticipates it, takes it personally, dramatizes it, and obsesses on its negative implications. 

Let’s look at an example applicable to social anxiety disorder: We find ourselves in a social situation where our apprehensions and fears overwhelm us. We feel incompetent and unattractive. Our dysfunction persuades us we are being judged, criticized, or held in contempt. We either feel we are the center of attention or invisible. Our deflated spirit and fraught emotions fight for dominance. 

How do we alleviate our fears and associated symptoms? We engage a well thought out and prepared diversion from our emotional/spiritual malaise by utilizing our supporting components, e.g., our mind and body. To divert is “to change course or turn from one direction to another.”  When ‘A’ is overwhelming, we engage ‘B’ or ‘C’ to mitigate “A.” (We instinctively divert readily. We go for a walk to calm our emotions, pray when anguished, vent frustration by bellowing or breaking something.) There are numerous ways to divert as we will discover; here are a few examples

Engage your body. Place a small item in your shoe, snap the rubber band around your wrist, or carry a distracting item in your pocket like a pushpin. Your slight physical discomfort diverts from your emotional and spiritual woes.

Engage your mind. Find three items in the room: the blue couch, red vase, cuckoo clock, and focus on them in moments of stress. Prepare event-focused PAs, repeating them the week before and mentally at the event. Learn the lyrics to an empowering song and mentally sing it.

Engaging Mind and Body. Subtly mimic a fearless or confident character from a film or book. Paul Newman created the walk to establish the character. 

With Positive Autobiography and positive psychologies, we retrieve those extraordinary moments of our lives resisted or repressed by the negative self-image generated by our dysfunction. Reflecting on these just before and during the event challenges our irrational perceptions of incompetence and worthlessness. 

Through mindfulness, practice, and the simultaneous restructuring of our neural network, these distractions or diversions will eventually become less important. 

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort (neuroses/disorders). Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for groups, workshops, and practicums.

Video: Neural Restructuring and Recovery

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When our neural pathways realign, there is a correlated change in behavior and perspective. Every thought, word, and action impel a receptive neuron to fire, transmitting a message, neuron to neuron to its destination. Positive messages contain the healthy thoughts and behaviors that supplant and overwhelm the years of toxic input generated by our dysfunction. Neural restructuring is a natural consequence of recovery; recovery is facilitated by neural restructuring.

MORE YOUTUBE VIDEOS

Self-esteem is the self-recognition of our value as applicable to our self, others, and the world; value is the accumulation of our positive self-qualities that generate our character strengths and virtues. Every physiological dysfunction generates a correlated deficiency of self-esteem due to the condition itself, and the corresponding disruption in natural human development.

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common mental disorders, affecting the emotional and mental wellbeing of millions of U.S. adults and adolescents who find themselves caught up in a densely interconnected network of fear and avoidance of social situations.

ReChanneling is dedicated to researching methods to alleviate symptoms of psychological dysfunctions (neuroses) and discomfort that impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life. It does this by targeting the personality through empathy, collaboration, and program integration.

Dispelling some of the folklore and misinformation about physiological dysfunction. We are all casualties of the ignorance, prejudice and discrimination attached to mental illness. Myth Number 1: Mental illness is an abnormal condition.

The disease or medical model of ‘mental’ health focuses on a deficit, disease model of human behavior. The wellness model focuses “on positive aspects of human functioning.” This disease model ‘defective’ emphasis has been the overriding psychiatric perspective for well over a century.

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort (neuroses). Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for groups, workshops, and practicums.

Social Anxiety Disorder: General Overview

Social anxiety disorder onsets at adolescence. The afflicted are not responsible for their dysfunction.

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common mental disorders, affecting the emotional and mental wellbeing of millions of U.S. adults and adolescents who find themselves caught up in a densely interconnected network of fear and avoidance of social situations. SAD is the second most diagnosed form of anxiety in the United States. Statistics estimate 40 million U.S. adults will experience SAD. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates 9.1% of adolescents (ages 10 to 19) currently experience symptoms, and 1.3% have severe impairment. Statistics are imperfect for LGBTQ+ persons; the Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimates their susceptibility is 1.5-2.5 times higher than that of their straight or gender-conforming counterparts. All statistics are fluid, however; a high percentage of persons who experience SAD refuse treatment, fail to disclose it, or remain ignorant of its symptoms. 

Social anxiety is arguably the most underrated, misunderstood, and misdiagnosed disorder. Debilitating and chronic, SAD attacks on all fronts, negatively affecting the entire body complex. It manifests in mental confusion, emotional instability, physical dysfunction, and spiritual malaise. Emotionally, persons experiencing SAD are depressed and lonely. In social situations, they are physically subject to unwarranted sweating and trembling, hyperventilation, nausea, cramps, dizziness, and muscle spasms. Mentally, thoughts are discordant and irrational. Spiritually, they define themselves as inadequate and insignificant. 

The commitment-to-remedy rate for those experiencing SAD in the first year is less than 6%. This statistic is reflective of symptoms that manifest perceptions of worthlessness and futility. SAD also has lower recovery-remission rates because many of the afflicted are unable to afford treatment due to symptom-induced employment instability. Over 70% of SAD persons are in the lowest economic group.

Social anxiety disorder is a pathological form of everyday anxiety. Feeling anxious or apprehensive in certain situations is normal; most individuals are nervous speaking in front of a group and anxious when visiting their dentist. The typical individual recognizes the normalcy of a situation and accords it appropriate attention. The SAD person anticipates it, personalizes it, dramatizes it, and obsesses on its negative implications. The clinical term “disorder” identifies extreme or excessive impairment that negatively affects functionality.

The generic symptom of SAD is intense apprehension—the fear of being judged, negatively evaluated and ridiculed. There is persistent anxiety and fear of social situations such as dating, interviewing for a position, answering a question in class, or dealing with authority. Often, mere functionality in perfunctory situations―eating in front of others, riding a bus, using a public restroom—can be unduly stressful. 

The fear that manifests in social situations is so fierce that many SAD persons believe it is beyond their control, which manifests in perceptions of incompetence and hopelessness. Negative self-evaluation interferes with the desire to pursue a goal, attend school, or do anything that might trigger anxiety. Often, the subject worries about things for weeks before they happen. Subsequentially, they will avoid places, events, or situations where there is the potential for embarrassment or ridicule.

The overriding fear of being found wanting manifests in self-perspectives of inferiority and unattractiveness. SAD persons are unduly concerned they will say something that will reveal their ignorance, real or otherwise. They walk on eggshells, supremely conscious of their awkwardness, surrendering to the GAZE―the anxious state of mind that comes with the maladaptive self-belief they are the uncomfortable center of attention. Their social interactions can appear hesitant and awkward, small talk clumsy, attempts at humor embarrassing–every situation reactive to negative self-evaluation. 

‘Maladaptive’ is a term created by Aaron Beck, the ‘father’ of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Although maladaptive self-beliefs can occur with many psychological dysfunctions, they are most common to SAD. A maladaptive self-belief is a negative self-perspective unsupported by reality. SAD persons can find themselves in a supportive and approving environment, but they tell themselves they are unwelcome and the subject of ridicule and contempt. They ‘adapt’ negatively to a positive situation.

SAD persons are often concerned about the visibility of their anxiety and are preoccupied with performance or arousal. SAD persons frequently generate images of themselves performing poorly in feared social situations, and their anticipation of repudiation motivates them to dismiss overtures to offset any possibility of rejection. The SAD subject meticulously avoids situations that might trigger discomfort. The maladaptive perceptions of inferiority and incompetence can generate profound and debilitating guilt and shame.  

SAD is repressive and intractable, imposing irrational thoughts and behavior. 

The key to SAD’s hold on its victims is its uncanny ability to sense vulnerability in the child/adolescent. SAD is like the person who comes to dinner and stays indefinitely. It feeds off its host’s irrationality. It crashes on the couch, surrounded by beer cans drained of hope and potential. It monopolizes the bathroom, creating missed opportunities. It becomes the predominant fixture in the house. After a while, its host not only grows accustomed to having it around but forms a subordinate dependency.

SAD persons crave the companionship but shun social situations for fear of being found out as unlikeable, stupid, or annoying. Accordingly, they avoid speaking in public, expressing opinions, or even fraternizing with peers. People with SAD are prone to low self-esteem and high self-criticism due to the dysfunction itself, and its causal disruption in natural human development.

SAD onset occurs during adolescence and can linger in the system for years or even decades before asserting itself. Any number of situations or events trigger the infection. The SAD person could have been subject to bullying or a broken home. Perhaps parents were overprotective, controlling, or unable to provide emotional validation. In some cases, its cause is perceptual. A child whose parental quality time is interrupted by a phone call can sense abandonment. The SAD person is not accountable for their dysfunction; there is the likelihood no one is intentionally responsible. 

SAD is routinely comorbid with depression and substance abuse. Symptom are similar to those of avoidant personality disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, OCD, and schizophrenia. Coupled with the discrepancies and disparity in its definition, epidemiology, assessment, and treatment, SAD is usually misdiagnosed.

For over 50 years, cognitive-behavioral therapy has been the go-to treatment for SAD. Only recently have experts determined that CBT can be ineffectual unless combined with a broader approach to account for SAD’s complexity and the individual personality. A SAD subject subsisting on paranoia sustained by negative self-evaluation is better served by multiple approaches, including those defined as new (third) wave (generation) therapies, developed through client trust, cultural assimilation, and therapeutic innovation. CBT, positive psychology, and neural restructuring might serve as the foundational platform for integration. SEE One-Size-Fits-All 

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

The Neglected Significance of Forgiveness in Recovery

The inability or unwillingness to forgive is self-defeating.

Science supports the cliché that by not forgiving, we allow the transgressor to occupy valuable space in our brain. We are so inundated from childhood with the concept of forgiveness, we tend to disregard its power and significance. The role of forgiveness is ridding ourselves of the unresolved antagonisms of hate, resentment, shame, and guilt. These are negatively valanced emotions, which means they are destructive to our physiological wellbeing. They are irrational in that they are harmful to the self. The fact that we get pleasure or satisfaction from our righteous indignation only means our neural network, not knowing any better, has become accustomed to this negativity and transmits the hormones that sustain and give us pleasure (serotonin). 

Recovery from our dysfunction or discomfort requires restructuring our neural network by feeding it positive stimuli to counter the years of harmful, negative input. But there is little room in our brain for healthy thoughts and behaviors unless we evict the bad tenants by forgiving them. That new vacancy allows us to access our character strengths and virtues that generate the motivation, persistence, and perseverance to recover.

We hold onto anger and resentment because we persuade ourselves it impacts those who transgressed against us. The irony is, they are (1) unaware they injured us, (2) have forgotten it, or (3) take no responsibility for it. The only person affected is us, the injured party.

We amplify the harm inflicted upon us by our irrational compulsion to hold onto our anger and resentment. The bile accumulates and festers until there is no room for things constructive to our recovery. To paraphrase Buddha, holding onto anger is holding onto a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you’re the one who gets burned. The inability or unwillingness to forgive is self-defeating.

Recovery requires letting go of our negative self-perspectives, expectations, and beliefs, opening our minds to new ideas and concepts. 

When we hold onto hate and resentment, we remain imprisoned in the past. Forgiveness opens us to new possibilities and offers hope for the future. 

Allowing our transgressors to dominate our thoughts makes us victims. Forgiving takes away their power. 

The drive for vengeance can be formidable, our baser instinct cries out for retribution. Forgiving is not easy. It takes enormous courage. That’s why it is so powerful

Forgiveness does not condone or excuse the transgressor; it takes their power away. 

We don’t forgive to make our transgressors feel better; they’re not important. We forgive to promote change within our self. 

There are three types of transgression: Those inflicted on us by another, those we inflict on another, and those we inflict on ourselves. We are both victim and abuser. We are victimized by the transgression against us. We abuse ourselves with our resentment and hate. When we transgress, we abuse the other, and our shame for the act victimizes us. Transgression against our self is both self-abuse and victimization. Abuser and victim. This is important to understand and accept. That is the role of mindfulness, a requisite for recovery.

Forgiving those who have harmed us. It is important to recognize that forgiveness is not forgetting or condoning. Our noble self forgives, our pragmatic self remembers. The actions of another may seem indefensible, but forgiving is for our wellbeing, not theirs. 

L. was in a group for social anxiety disorder. He claimed he couldn’t forgive his parents; their injustice was so severe. “If you knew what they’d done to me you wouldn’t ask me to forgive them.” L was unwilling to relinquish his parents’ negative hold on his psyche, much like a cancer victim refusing chemotherapy. Unlike many, he was mindful of the physiological ramifications of holding onto his nixtamalization, which mitigated the negative impact on his recovery, but it will remain an obstacle to recovery until L is willing to forgive and let it go.

Forgiving ourselves for harming another is accepting and releasing the guilt and shame for our actions. It’s important to recognize, transgression against another is a transgression against ourselves. The act of self-forgiveness accepts and embraces our imperfections and evidences our humanness.

Forgiving ourselves for harming ourselves. Transgression against the self is self-deprecation. It is telling ourselves we are worthless by belittling, undervaluing, or disparaging ourselves. Self-pity, self-contempt, and other hyphenated forms of self-abuse. devalue our inherent character strengths and virtues. Forgiving ourselves is challenging because our self-harm is generated by our deficit of self-esteem.

By withholding forgiveness, we deny ourselves the ability to function optimally. Our resentment and hatred are divisive to our emotional wellbeing and disharmonious to our true nature. Inner harmony is impossible unless we heal the anger within ourselves. Forgiving is the only way we expel the hostility. We cannot hope to function optimally without absolving both our self and others whose actions contributed to our negative thoughts and behavior. This courageous willingness to forgive is indispensable to recovery. 

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort (neuroses/disorders). Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

Healthy Philautia and Self-Esteem

Healthy philautia serves as a focused revitalization tool for self-esteem

Healthy philautia is an integrative platform specifically designed to address the deficit of self-esteem caused by our dysfunction or discomfort, and the disruption in human development.

Self-esteem is mindfulness (recognition and acceptance) of our value to our self, society, and the world. Self-esteem can be further understood as a complex interrelationship between how we think about ourselves, how we think others perceive us, and how we process or present that information.

Self-esteem deficits are the consequence of disapproval, criticism, and apathy of influential others—family, colleagues, ministers, teachers. Any number of factors impact self-esteem including our environment, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity, and education.

  • Our negative self-image is generated by our deficit of self-esteem.
  • Self-esteem administers and is determined by our self-properties. Positive self-properties: self -reliant, -compassionate, -confidant, -worth, etc. Negative self-properties: self -destructive, -loathing, -denigrating, etc.
  • Our positive self-properties tell us we are of value, consequential, and desirable. 
  • Our intrinsic self-esteem is never fully depleted or lost; however, underutilized self-properties can be dormant like the unexercised muscle in our arm or leg.
  • Self-esteem impacts our mind, body, spirit, and emotions separately and in concert. Mindfulness of this complementarity is important to emotional and behavioral control as we learn utilize each component.
  • We rediscover and reinvigorate our self-esteem through exercises designed to help us become mindful of our inherent strengths, virtues, and attributes. 

It achieves this through an integration of historically and clinically practical approaches that serve as focused revitalization tools for self-esteem by recognizing and replacing negative self-perspective and behavior. 

Physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Both conditions impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life and can interfere with or limit one or more major life activities. Both are addressed through the same basic processes. The primary distinction is severity. A physiological dysfunction is defined as a mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder of sufficient duration to meet diagnosable criteria. Both are dysfunctions.

How dysfunction impacts self-esteem. The vast majority of dysfunctional onset (or susceptibility to onset) happens during childhood/adolescence, negatively impacting the development of self-esteem. This is best illustrated by Maslow’s hierarchy of needs which reveals how childhood physical, emotional, or sexual disturbance disrupts natural human development. The perception of detachment, exploitation, or neglect disenables the child’s safety and security as well as the sense of belonging and being loved, which impacts the acquisition of self-esteem. The adult symptoms and characteristics of the dysfunction continue or augment that deficit. 

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Childhood physical, emotional, or sexual disturbance disrupts natural human development.

Why Healthy Philautia? The Greeks categorized love by its object. For philia, the object is comradeship, eros is sexuality, storge is familiar affection, and so on. Philautia is the dichotomy of self-love: the love of oneself (narcissism), and the love that is within oneself (self-esteem). 

Narcissism is a psychological condition in which people function with an inflated and irrational sense of their importance, often expressed by haughtiness or arrogance. It is the need for excessive attention and admiration, masking an unconscious sense of inferiority and inadequacy. 

Healthy philautia is the recognition of our value and potential, the realization that we are necessary to this life and of incomprehensible worth. To feel joy and fulfillment at being you is the experience of healthy philautia,and such feelings cannot be boundAccepting and embracing our self-worth compels us to share it with others and the world, to love and be loved. 

The deprivation of our fundamental needs caused by our dysfunction detrimentally impacts our acquisition of self-esteem. It is not lost but hidden, undeveloped, subverted by our negative self-perspectives. The rediscovery and rejuvenation of self-esteem is an essential component of recovery. ReChanneling advocates and utilizes a Wellness Model over the etiology-driven disease or medical model of mental healthcare. The Wellness Model emphasizes the character strengths and virtues that generate the motivation, persistence, and perseverance to function optimally through the substantial alleviation of the symptoms of dysfunction. 

Among the integrative approaches utilized in the reacquisition of self-esteem are:

  • Positive affirmations and CBT. Positive affirmations and the cognitive aspect of cognitive-behavioral therapy are deliberate, repetitious inputs of positive thoughts and behaviors to replace the negative, unhealthy ones habituated by our dysfunction. Practicing repetitive positive affirmations increases activity in the self-processing systems of the cortex, which counteracts the negative input that threatens self-esteem. The behavioral component of CBT involves activities that reinforce the process.
  • Neural restructuring. Our neural network automatically responds to stimuli by transmitting the hormones that sustain and provide us comfort and pleasure. Deliberate repetitious stimuli compel neurons to fire repeatedly causing them to wire together. The more positive input, the more our brain responds. The more repetitions, the quicker and stronger the new connection. Hormonal rewards of comfort and pleasure motivate us to continue the repetitive practice which, in time, reconstruct our brain’s neural pathways. 
  • Mindfulness is a state of active, open recognition and acceptance of present realities. It is the act of embracing our flaws as well as our inherent character strengths, virtues, and attributes. Mindfulness is the key to reengaging our positive self-properties that constitute healthy self-esteem. Clinically proven questionnaires and surveys assist in discovery, and mindfulness exercises and techniques are examined. Practicum activities assiduously address these fears, while introspection and meditation are vigorously recommended for the home environment. 
  • Abhidharma is the ultimate checklist of our relationship to self, others, and the world. The Buddhist psychology of the eightfold path is a profile of the requisites for rational living. Right views, intention, speech, action, livelihood, effort, mindfulness, and concentration have an additional implicit component, that of right choice. Evidence suggests we experience a physiological reaction when choosing to do something irrational or self-detrimental because it conflicts with our inherent awareness of what is beneficial to self and community. Through mindfulness, we learn to recognize this physiological reaction and its impact on our self-esteem. 
  • Positive autobiography helps us focus on our life experiences of achievement, triumphs, and other prideful events and occasions. Our dysfunction sustains itself through irrationality, so we devalue these experiences by disallowing our conscious mind to entertain them. Mindfulness and the Recovered-memory process are especially helpful in unlocking this information. 
  • Positive psychology can be defined as the science of optimal functioning. Its objective is to identify the character strengths and virtues that generate our motivation, persistence, and perseverance to recover. Mindfulness of our attributes generates the psychological, physical, and social wellbeing that buffer against dysfunction. The objective is to achieve our potentials and becoming the best that we can be. Research shows that positive psychology interventions improve overall wellbeing and decrease physiological distress in persons with anxiety, mood, and depressive disorders. Studies support the utilization of positive psychological constructs, theories, and interventions for enhanced understanding of and recovery from our dysfunction. 
  • Recovered memory process is utilized to recall hidden memories and the emotions they embrace. Our dysfunction sustains itself on our irrationality and negative self-perceptions. It encourages us to repress feelings, thoughts, and desires unacceptable to our conscious mind, storing them in the archives of our memory. It is useful to retrieve and address the emotions hidden in these repressed memories. The prideful ones fulfill our Positive autobiography and support Neural restructuring. The unhealthy ones allow us to view them from the multiple perspectives of emotion, decreasing the power of their negativity. Stanislavski developed a method for authentic stage-acting that retrieves and deconstructs our volatile memories and emotions. 

The rediscovery and revitalization of self-esteem is an essential part of recovery and cannot be second-tiered. Due to our dysfunction and subsequent disruption in natural human development, we are subject to significantly lower implicit and explicit self-esteem relative to healthy controls. One-size-fits-all methods are inadequate to a multiple pronged approach. Our recovery practicum incorporates activities such as roleplay, interactive exercises, and games. Clinically proven self-esteem exercises, questionnaires, and scales are utilized. Immersion therapy is ideally practiced in a public environment setting but currently remains in-practicum, postponing public immersion for the duration of the pandemic. Utilizing the platform of methods outlined, we collaboratively create a blueprint that emphasizes our inherent strengths, virtues, and attributes to implement the crucial reacquisition of self-esteem and its positive self-qualities.

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

Video: Social Anxiety Disorder and Relationships

YouTube

This YouTube Video is a brief PowerPoint presentation of social anxiety disorder and its impact on the individual’s emotional wellbeing and quality of life. One of the characteristics of social anxiety disorder, or its appropriate acronym, SAD, is the difficulty in establishing interpersonal relationships. SAD persons find it hard to establish close, personal connections. The avoidance of social activities and fear of rejection limits the potential for comradeship, and the inability to interact rationally and productively makes long-term, healthy relationships difficult.

Social anxiety disorder is arguably the most underrated and misunderstood psychological dysfunction. A debilitating and chronic affliction, SAD affects the perceptual, cognitive, personality, and social activities of the afflicted. It wreaks havoc on the person ‘s emotional wellbeing and quality of life. Almost one out of every three persons in the U. S. experiences some anxiety disorder at some point in their lives; 30 million are impacted by social anxiety disorder.

MORE YOUTUBE VIDEOS

The disease or medical model of ‘mental’ health focuses on a deficit, disease model of human behavior. The wellness model focuses “on positive aspects of human functioning.” This disease model ‘defective’ emphasis has been the overriding psychiatric perspective for well over a century.

When our neural pathways realign, there is a correlated change in behavior and perspective. Every thought, word, and action impel a receptive neuron to fire, transmitting a message, neuron to neuron to its destination. Positive messages contain the healthy thoughts and behaviors that supplant and overwhelm the years of toxic input generated by our dysfunction.

ReChanneling is dedicated to researching methods to alleviate symptoms of psychological dysfunctions (neuroses) and discomfort that impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life. It does this by targeting the personality through empathy, collaboration, and program integration.

Dispelling some of the folklore and misinformation about physiological dysfunction. We are all casualties of the ignorance, prejudice and discrimination attached to mental illness. Myth Number 1: Mental illness is an abnormal condition.

Self-esteem is the self-recognition of our value as applicable to our self, others, and the world; value is the accumulation of our positive self-qualities that generate our character strengths and virtues. Every physiological dysfunction generates a correlated deficiency of self-esteem due to the condition itself, and the corresponding disruption in natural human development.

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to mitigate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort (neuroses). Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

Video: Psychological Dysfunction and Discomfort: Myths and Misinformation

Dr. Mullen discusses the myths and misinformation about mental health supported by the pathographic focus of the disease model of mental healthcare, which is responsible for negative public opinion, media misrepresentation, misdiagnoses, stigma, and overall pessimism of the industry as a whole. The video illustrates the benefits of transitioning to the wellness model, which emphasizes the character strengths and virtues that generate the motivation, persistence, and perseverance to endure and recover.

More YouTube Videos

Self-esteem is the self-recognition of our value as applicable to our self, others, and the world; value is the accumulation of our positive self-qualities that generate our character strengths and virtues. Every physiological dysfunction generates a correlated deficiency of self-esteem due to the condition itself, and the corresponding disruption in natural human development. YouTube

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most common mental disorders, affecting the emotional and mental wellbeing of millions of U.S. adults and adolescents who find themselves caught up in a densely interconnected network of fear and avoidance of social situations. YouTube

When our neural pathways realign, there is a correlated change in behavior and perspective. Every thought, word, and action impel a receptive neuron to fire, transmitting a message, neuron to neuron to its destination. Neural restructuring is a natural consequence of recovery; recovery is facilitated by neural restructuring. YouTube

ReChanneling is dedicated to researching methods to alleviate symptoms of psychological dysfunctions (neuroses) and discomfort that impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life. It does this by targeting the personality through empathy, collaboration, and program integration. YouTube

The disease or medical model of ‘mental’ health focuses on a deficit, disease model of human behavior. The Wellness Model focuses “on positive aspects of human functioning.” This disease model ‘defective’ emphasis has been the overriding psychiatric perspective for well over a century. YouTube

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

Deconstructing ReChanneling

a paradigmatic approach to historically and clinically practical methods of recovery

ReChanneling is dedicated to researching methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunctions and discomfort (neuroses/disorders) that impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life. It does this by targeting the personality through empathy, collaboration, and program integration. ReChanneling is a system of common-sense solutions, evident in their simplicity. It is a paradigmatic approach to historically and clinically practical methods. 

ReChanneling’s Origins

Affected with social anxiety disorder, ReChanneling’s director spent his developing years assuming his emotional and behavioral problems were due to some moral inadequacy, a diagnosis supported by family, clergy, and even health professionals. Years later, study for his degree revealed social anxiety disorder. Armed with that knowledge, Mullen set forward to develop methods to alleviate the symptoms of dysfunctions and discomforts, beginning with colleagues also afflicted with social anxiety disorder. These efforts developed into workshops and practicums for over 500 San Francisco bay area individuals. Recognizing the similarities among psychological dysfunctions, Dr. Robert F. Mullen broadened his research to include the multiple forms of anxiety and depression and their comorbidities, e.g., PTSD, OC-D, substance abuse, self-esteem issues, etc. ReChanneling is the culmination of those efforts. 

Dr. Mullen is the director of ReChanneling Inc, which offers a paradigmatic approach to optimum human functioning by emphasizing your character strengths, virtues, and attributes. A published worldwide academic author, Mullen holds seminars, practicums, and workshops on alleviating symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort (disorders/neuroses), rechanneling negative perspective and self-image by harnessing our intrinsic aptitude for extraordinary living and potential to lift the human spirit. His academic disciplines include contemporary behavior, modified psychobiography , and positive psychologies. He has the unique combination of his education and professional background and his own social anxiety experiences, along with 15 years of research, development, and publishing on the alleviation of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and other neuroses. 

Psychological dysfunctions and discomforts. Both conditions can result in functional impairment which interferes with or limits one or more major life activities. Both impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life. Both are addressed through the same basic processes. The primary distinction between the two is severity. A psychological dysfunction is defined as a mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder of sufficient duration to meet diagnosable criteria. However, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is prone to rampant misdiagnoses and substantial discrepancies and variations in definition, epidemiology, assessment, and treatment. ReChanneling advocates and supports the Wellness Model over the etiology-driven disease or medical model of mental healthcare. The Wellness Model emphasizes the character strengths and virtues that generate the motivation, persistence, and perseverance to function optimally through the substantial mitigation of symptoms of psychological dysfunction and discomfort. 

While we recognize the value of trauma-based and regression therapies, our focus is on the here-and-now, advocating the Wellness Model’s emphasis on solution over the problem-oriented disease model. Mindfulness, the state of active, open recognition and acceptance of present realities is essential to recovery.

A Paradigmatic Approach 

The Wellness Model. One of the disadvantages of the etiological perspective is that you focus on the dysfunction over the individual; traditional psychology has abandoned studying the entire human experience in favor of focusing on diagnosis. Evidence suggests that conventional psychiatric diagnoses have outlived their usefulness. The National Institute of Mental Health, for example, is replacing diagnoses with easily understandable descriptions of the issues based on the emerging research data, not on the current symptom-based categories. 

The disease model of mental health focuses on the problem, creating a harmful symbiosis of individual and their dysfunction.. We become our diagnosis. The Wellness Model emphasizes the solution. A battle is not won by focusing on incompetence and weakness; it is won by knowing and utilizing our strengths, and attributes. That is how we positively function―with pride and self-reliance and determination―with the awareness of what we are capable. 

One-size-fits-all. The single solution approach perpetuated by the disease model of mental health and the American Psychiatric Association is insubstantial. (Almost 90 percent of recovery programs pursue cognitive-behavioral treatments.) The ineffectiveness of One-size-fits-all approaches is evident in their singular focus, which cannot sufficiently address the complexities of human thought and behavior generated by the individual human systems which help determine personality. Personality is how we embrace and express the sum of experiences.

Complementarity is the inherent cooperation of our human system components in maintaining physiological equilibrium. Sustainability-of-life and sustainability of a psychological dysfunction require simultaneous mutual interaction. Recognizing the constant collaboration of our mind, body, spirit, and emotions is crucial to emotional and behavioral oversight. 

A Targeted Approach

Addressing the complexity of the personality demands integrating multiple traditional and non-traditional approaches, developed through client trust, cultural assimilation, and therapeutic innovation. There is no one right way to do or experience growth or recovery. Any evaluation and treatment program must be innovative, fluid, and targeted. Culture, environment, history, and associations in conjunction with social, creative, and intellectual needs and aspirations are necessary components of any successful strategy. Consideration of each determines our value and the efficacy of the program.

A WORKING PLATFORM showing encouraging results for most psychological dysfunctions and discomforts is an integration of positive psychology’s optimum human functioning with CBT’s behavior modification, neuroscience’s network restructuring, and other targeted approaches.

Positive Psychology. The Wellness Model’s chief facilitator is positive psychology, which originated with Maslow’s (1943) seminal text on humanism. Positive psychology focuses on virtues and strengths that help you transform and flourish. Until recently, the focus on optimal functioning’s positive aspects ignored the individual’s holism by neglecting their negative aspects. Positive Psychology 2.0 emphasizes the positive while managing and processing the negative to increase wellbeing. Although it functions best in conjunction with other programs, PP’s mental health interventions have proved successful in mitigating the symptoms of depression, anxiety, and other disorders. Growing research suggests that PP not only improves life outcomes but improves overall health. PP interventions produced significant improvements in emotional wellbeing while also decreasing symptoms of anxiety and depression.

CBT.  Cognitive theory assumes that our dysfunction results from negative, irrational thinking and behavior caused by our ingrained reactions to situations and conditions. CBT trains us to recognize these irrational thoughts and beliefs that sustain our discomfort or dysfunction and replace them with healthy ones until they become automatic and permanent.

The behavioral component of CBT involves activities that reinforce the process. Despite recent criticism, when utilized in concert with other programs, CBT has been proven effective in addressing depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and other disorders. CBT is structured, goal-oriented, and focused on the present and the solution. The repetitive behavioral exercises of CBT and positive affirmations are beneficial in the reconstruction of our brain patterns. 

We acclimate to our condition, and our neural network transmits chemicals and hormones to support it, so it is often difficult to envision a light at the end of the tunnel. 

Neural Restructuring (Plasticity). Science confirms our neural pathways are continually realigning. Our brains do not think or analyze; they are organic reciprocators. The irrational thoughts and behaviors that we feed our brain are neuro-transmitted back to us in the chemicals and hormones that sustain us, creating an unhealthy cycle that affects our entire outlook on life. A conscious input of healthy thought patterns reshapes our neural network to a structure supported by neurotransmitters conducive to dramatically altering our outlook on life. However, it does not happen overnight, which is why we begin the process on day one of recovery. 

Healthy Philautia. The loss of self-esteem is due to the disruption in our natural human development caused by childhood physical, emotional, or sexual disturbance. This disturbance impacts satisfaction of three basic human needs: physiological, safety, and belongingness and love. That lacuna hinders the development of our self-qualities essential to our emotional and physiological development. Healthy philautia is the polar opposite of narcissism–the self-appreciation that recognizes we are consequential and worthy of love. Healthy philautia serves as a focused revitalization tool for self-esteem. 

Emotional Retrieval and Control

Emotions are associated with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation. Do they dictate our behavior, or are we able to manage their volatility? Rather than succumbing to emotional instability, awareness of the origins of emotional instability prevents reactionary outbursts and inconsistency due to lack of foresight, empathy, and perspective. 

Emotional Retrieval and Control is a duel-directional program (Recovered-Memory Process and Affective Emotion Management) that focuses on the recovery and control of our memories and emotions. They evolved from Constantin Stanislavski’s method acting .

Recovered-Memory Process is the umbrella term for methods or techniques utilized in recalling memories. We repress certain feelings, thoughts, and desires unacceptable to the conscious mind and store them in the archives of our memory. Emotions are not solitary and exclusive but fluid and mutually interconnected, although we allow one to situationally dominate the others. We choose the one that suits a psychological need. It is helpful to retrieve and address the emotions felt in those repressed memories that once flashed by like a meteor. Certain memories and associated emotions become anxiety-overbearing and physiologically harmful with negative implications. Utilizing Stanislavski’s method of emotional management, we assume control of our emotions, rather than allowing them to control us. 

Affective Emotion Management. Emotions are not solitary and exclusive but fluid and mutually interconnected, although we allow one to dominate the others. Love and hate are indistinct and interchangeable extremes of the same instinct as are laughter and tears, resentment and acceptance, and so on. The ability of the film actor to project an emotion when script and scheduling demands it, demonstrates they are controllable. Any situation can be experienced though laughter, tears, pride, or anger. We choose the one that suits a psychological need, which exposes its transience and manipulability. Utilizing Stanislavski’s method of emotional management, we assume control of our emotions, rather than allowing them to control us,

Practicum versus Therapy

ReChanneling is practicum over therapy. A practicum is designed for self-reliance. While therapy often incurs a subordinacy to or dependency on the counselor, a practicum is a program developed in collaboration with the individual that targets her or his unique condition. We design a blueprint and provide the recovery methods, but the responsibility for achieving the goal rests on the individual, who controls the progress with the facilitator’s guidance.

Fundamental Concepts, Challenging Execution. 

The solutions are common-sense and evident in their simplicity. ReChanneling is not a new concept; it is a paradigmatic approach to historically or clinically effective methods. Its holistic advancement is in targeting the personality through empathy, collaboration, and program integration. Developing the methodology is the easy part. The challenge is in its execution. While progress is exponential, goals are not met overnight. Human development is an ongoing process. For example, neural network restructuring begins immediately, but estimates suggest it may take up to a year for significant rebuilding restructure significantly. That may seem like a long time but remember, your dysfunction has likely impacted you since childhood. Recovery is a lifelong work-in-progress.

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

Dysfunction is Evidence of Our Humanness.

Simultaneous mutual interaction of all human system components is required for sustainability of life and sustainability of dysfunction or discomfort.

There is a joke that circulates among mental health professionals. Why do only 26% of people have a diagnosable mental disorder? . . . Because the other 74% haven’t been diagnosed yet.

We are all psychologically dysfunctional in some way. “Mental illnesses are so common that almost everyone will develop at least one diagnosable mental disorder at some point in their life” (Scientific American). 

Why do we treat the mentally ill with contempt, trepidation, and ridicule? We are hard-wired to fear and isolate mental illness, and we have been misinformed by history and the disease model of mental health. There are four common misconceptions about psychological dysfunctions. They are (1) abnormal and selective, (2) a consequence of behavior, (3) solely mental, and (4) psychotic. 

Let us deconstruct these misconceptions, beginning with the latter.

The dysfunctional are psychotic.

There are two degrees of mental disorder: neuroses and psychoses. When someone sees, hears, or responds to things that are not actual, they are having a psychotic episode. While few persons experience psychosis, everyone has moderate-and-above levels of anxiety, stress, and depression. We are universally neurotic. Since the overwhelming majority of mental disorders are neuroses, we are all dysfunctional to some extent. (Although the term ‘neurosis’ has been effectively eliminated from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, it is a far less prejudicial term than mental illness. We prefer the term ‘physiological dysfunction and discomfort’ to embrace neuroses and disorders).

A dysfunction is abnormal or selective. 

A neurosis is a condition that negatively impacts our emotional wellbeing and quality of life but does not necessarily impair or interfere with normal day-to-day functions. It is a standard part of natural human development. One-in-four individuals have a diagnosable neurosis. According to the World Health Organization, nearly two-thirds of people who have a neurosis reject or refuse to disclose their condition. Include those who dispute or chose to remain oblivious to their dysfunction, we can conclude that mental disorders are common, undiscriminating, and impact us all in some fashion or another. Many of us have more than one disorder; depression and anxiety are commonly comorbid, often accompanied by substance abuse. 

A dysfunction is the consequence of a person’s behavior. 

Combined statistics prove that 89% of neuroses onset at adolescence or earlier. In the rare event conditions like PTSD or clinical narcissism begin later in life, the susceptibility originates in childhood. Most psychologists agree that a neurosis is a consequence of childhood physical, emotional, or sexual disturbance. Any number of things can cause this. Perhaps parents are controlling or do not provide emotional validation. Maybe the child is subjected to bullying or from a broken home. Behaviors later in life may impact the severity but are not responsible for the neurosis itself. It is never the child’s fault, nor reflective of their behavior. There is the likelihood no one is intentionally responsible. This disputes moral models that we are to blame for our disorder, or it is God’s punishment for sin.  

A dysfunction is solely mental.

To early civilizations, mental illness was the domain of supernatural forces and demonic possession. Hippocrates and diagnosticians of the 19th century looked at the relative proportions of bodily fluids. Lunar influence, sorcery, and witchcraft are timeless culprits. In the early 20th century, it was somatogenic. The biological approach argues that neuroses are related to the brain’s physical functioning, while pharmacology promotes it as chemical or hormonal imbalance. However, the simultaneous mutual interaction of all human system components—mind, body, spirit, and emotions—is required for sustainability and recovery.

The disease model focuses on the history of deficit behavior. The American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) brief definition of neurosis contains the following words: distressing, irrational, obsessive, compulsive, dissociative, depressive, exaggerated, unconscious, and conflicts. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published by the APA, uses words like incapable, deceitful, unempathetic, manipulative, difficult, irresponsible, and incompetent. 

This ‘defective’ emphasis has been the overriding psychiatric perspective for over a century. The disease model is the chief proponent of the notion that the mentally ill are dangerous and unpredictable. We distance ourselves and deem them socially undesirable. We stigmatize them. The irony is, we are them. 

  • Over one-third of family members hide their relationship with their dysfunctional child or sibling to avoid bringing shame to the family. They are considered family undesirable, a devaluation potentially more life-limiting and disabling than the neurosis itself. 
  • The media stereotypes neurotics as homicidal schizophrenics, impassive childlike prodigies, or hair-brained free-spirits. One study evidenced over half of U.S. news stories involving the dysfunctional allude to violence. 
  • Psychologists argue that more persons would seek treatment if psychiatric services were less stigmatizing. There are complaints of rude or dismissive staff, coercive measures, excessive wait times, paternalistic or demeaning attitudes, pointless treatment programs, drugs with undesirable side-effects, stigmatizing language, and general therapeutic pessimism. 
  • The disease model supports doctor-patient power dominance. Clinicians deal with 31 similar and comorbid disorders, 400 plus schools of psychotherapy, multiple treatment programs, and an evolving plethora of medications. They cannot grasp the personal impact of a neurosis because they are too focused on the diagnosis. 

A recent study of 289 clients in 67 clinics found that 76.4% were misdiagnosed. An anxiety clinic reported over 90% of clients with generalized anxiety were incorrectly diagnosed. Experts cite the difficulty in distinguishing different disorders or identifying specific etiological risk factors due to the DSM’s failing reliability statistics. Even mainstream medical authorities have begun to criticize the validity and humanity of conventional psychiatric diagnoses. The National Institute of Mental Health believes traditional psychiatric diagnoses have outlived their usefulness and suggests replacing them with easily understandable descriptions of the issues. 

Because of the disease model’s emphasis on diagnosis, we focus on the dysfunction rather than the individual. Which disorder do we find most annoying or repulsive? What behaviors contribute to the condition? How progressive is it, and how effective are treatments? Is it contagious? We derisively label the obvious dysfunctional ‘a mental case.’

Realistically, we cannot eliminate the word ‘mental’ from the culture. Unfortunately, its negative perspectives and implications promulgate perceptions of incompetence, ineptitude, and unlovability. Stigma, the hostile expression of someone’s undesirability, is pervasive and destructive. Stigmatization is deliberate, proactive, and distinguishable by pathographic overtones intended to shame and isolate. 90% of persons diagnosed with a mental disorder claim they have been impacted by mental health stigma. Disclosure jeopardizes livelihoods, relationships, social standing, housing, and quality of life. 

The disease model assumes that emotional distress is merely symptomatic of biological illness. The Wellness Model focuses on the positive aspects of human functioning that promote our wellbeing and recognize our essential and shared humanity. The Wellness Model emphasizes what is right with us, innately powerful within us, our potential, and determination. Recovery is not achieved by focusing on incompetence and weakness; it is achieved by embracing and utilizing our inherent strengths and abilities. 

Benefits of the Wellness Model

  • Revising negative and hostile language will encourage new positive perspectives
  • The self-denigrating aspects of shame will dissipate, and stigma becomes less threatening. 
  • A doctor-client knowledge exchange will value the individual over the diagnosis.
  • Realizing neurosis is a natural part of human development will generate social acceptance and accommodation. 
  • Recognizing that they bear no responsibility for onset will revise public opinion that  people deserve their neurosis because it is the result of their behavior. 
  • Emphasizing character strengths and virtues will positively impact self-beliefs and image, leading to more disclosure, discussion, and recovery-remission. 
  • Realizing proximity and susceptibility will address the desire to distance and isolate. 
  • Emphasis on value and potential will encourage accountability and foster self-reliance.

The impact of a neurosis begins at childhood; recovery is a long-term commitment. The Wellness Model creates the blueprint and then guides, teaches, and supports throughout the recovery process by emphasizing our intrinsic character strengths and attributes that generate the motivation, persistence, and perseverance to recover. 

The adage, treat others as you want to be treated, takes on added relevance when we accept that we all experience mental disorder. In fact, dysfunction is evidence of our humanness.

A referenced copy of this article is available: rechanneling@yahoo.com.

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunctions and discomfort (neuroses/disorders). Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.