Category Archives: Neuroplasticity

ReChanneling: Recovery and Empowerment

We have created a ReChanneling membership group. This group will focus on utilizing the tools and techniques of proactive neuroplasticity to support personal goals and objectives—eliminating a bad habit, self-transformation—harnessing our intrinsic aptitude for extraordinary living. Members will receive a discount on groups, lectures, and workshops, have exclusive access to articles, innovative research, and a first look at the upcoming book in development: Recovery and Empowerment. Harnessing Your Aptitude for Extraordinary Living through ReChanneling.

ReChanneling: Recovery and Empowerment evolved from a 640-member group that focuses on social anxiety disorder. It is also an extension of my course offered by Academia.edu called Neuroscience and Happiness. Neuroplasticity and Positive Behavioral Change. Years of research, writing, and facilitating recovery groups and workshops that address dysfunction and discomfort evidenced that the methods utilized are fundamentally applicable to supporting our motivating personal concerns.

What is significant is our ability to dramatically accelerate learning by deliberately compelling our brain to repattern its neural circuitry. Neuroplasticity via deliberate, repetitive, neural information (DRNI) empowers us to proactively transform our thoughts, behaviors, and perspectives, creating healthy new mindsets, skills, and abilities. 

Proactive neuroplasticity accelerates learning by deliberately compelling our brain to repattern its neural circuitry. It’s what makes learning and registering new experiences possible. All information notifies our brain to restructure, producing a correlated change in behavior and perspective. 

ReChanneling targets the personality through empathy, collaboration, and program integration, utilizing science and clinically-proven methods. These include proactive neuroplasticity, cognitive-behavioral therapy, positive psychology, and techniques designed towards the recovery and reinvigoration of self-esteem. 

This is a group for individuals who want to change their life by harnessing their intrinsic aptitude for extraordinary living. We will be a national, diverse membership, sharing experiences and insight through workshops, activities, discussion groups, virtual conference calls, etc.

Link to join: https://www.meetup.com/ReChanneling/

Or, if you would like additional information before joining, please fill out the following form.

Anatomy of an Online Recovery Group

IStock/FatCamera

Personal • Group • Corporate     Seminars • Workshops • Groups

ReChanneling is dedicated to researching methods to alleviate symptoms of dysfunction (disorder) and discomfort (neurosis) that impact an individual’s emotional wellbeing and quality of life. Its paradigmatic approach targets the personality through empathy, collaboration, and program integration utilizing science and clinically-practical methods. These include proactive neuroplasticity, cognitive-behavioral therapy, positive psychology, and techniques designed towards the recovery and reinvigoration of self-esteem disrupted by the adolescent onset of dysfunction. 

The suspension of on-site workshops due to pandemic restrictions compelled ReChanneling to focus on online recovery groups, broadening our outreach from local to national participation. Our social anxiety group, for example, includes persons from SF, Vancouver, NYC, Riverside, Taos, Tracy, Los Angeles, Houston, and so on. Although we will be reinstituting on-site workshops next year, we will continue our online recovery work with persons nationally. 

Rechanneling’s focus on recovery from anxiety and depression has expanded to the comorbidities that factor into groups and workshops. In one anxiety Recovery Group, comorbidities included major depression, PTSD, OCD, ADHD, and substance abuse. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America and other expert organizations report multiple dysfunctions related to social anxiety including major depression, panic disorder, alcohol abuse, PTSD, avoidant personality disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, substance abuse, eating disorders, schizophrenia, ADHD, and agoraphobia. Well over 60% of individuals with anxiety also have depression are both are commonly associated with substance abuse. They can all be treated by the same paradigmatic approach that fosters self-reliance, determination, and perseverance. This overview focuses on social anxiety and, by design, its multiple comorbidities.

The symptomatic similarities impacting disorders and neuroses are established by cause and origin. Cumulative evidence that a toxic childhood leads to psychological complications has been well-established, as has the recognition of early exploitation as a primary causal factor in lifetime emotional instability. It has been determined that the onset of dysfunction happens in adolescence or earlier as a consequence of childhood physical, emotional, or sexual disturbance. This causes a disruption in natural human development negatively impacting the satisfaction of self-esteem. In those cases of later onset of some PTSD and clinical narcissism, the susceptibility originates in childhood. 

The Online Recovery Group.

Logistics. Lecture halls can accommodate hundreds of people; a workshop, perhaps 15. A targeted Recovery Group is most effective with a maximum of 10 on-site participants, and six or fewer online 

Composition. Constructing the human component of a Recovery Group is akin to assembling a jury. Compatibility of diagnoses is important. Individuals with anxiety and depression function well together; combining narcissistic personality with social anxiety disorder might be unwise. Sex, race, education, region, and sexual orientation do not factor in as much as political, philosophical, and religious leanings; tolerance and compatibility are essential. Adolescents function best in their own environment. The severity of diagnosis, determined by a series of evaluation forms, is rarely a factor in neuroses; psychoses require medical intervention. The final determination of compatibility within a Recovery Group can be assessed during the initial group interaction.

A healthy composition of shared experiences produces a supportive, collegial atmosphere where individuals are comfortable delving into issues and activities that might otherwise be emotionally or culturally prohibitive. 

Confidentiality. Roughly two-thirds of persons with diagnosable disorders do not disclose or seek recovery due to several justifiable attributions – public opinion, media misrepresentation, visibility, stigma, etc. The symptoms and traits of dysfunction generate a reticence to self-revelation. Three levels of confidentiality are established to address this: (1) information shared within the group says within the group, (2) personal information revealed in written exercise is addressed individually, and (3) some personal information important to self-evaluation can remain with the individual; the objective is personal revelation. 

Objectives. The primary objective of a Recovery Group is to provide the tools and techniques to dramatically mitigate the symptoms and traits of anxiety, depression, and their comorbidities. 

Recovery is an individual process. Just as there is no one right way to do or experience recovery, so also what helps us at one time in our life may not help us at another. One-size-fits-all treatment programs are inefficient. Any evaluation and treatment program must comprehensively address the dynamic complexity of the individual personality. Recovery Groups must consider the groups’ environment, culture, history, and autobiography in conjunction with individual wants, needs, and aspirations. Absent that, complexity and distinction are not valued, and the treatment is inadequate.

Our integration of approaches includes proactive neuroplasticity via the deliberate repetition of neural information (DRNI); cognitive-behavioral therapy’s behavior modification; positive psychology’s optimal functioning, and subjective experience; and targeted supported and non-traditional approaches utilized to reinvigorate self-esteem and address maladaptive and self-destructive thoughts and behaviors.

Each approach collaborates with and supports the others.

Proactive Neuroplasticity. What is significant is the individual’s ability to dramatically accelerate learning and modification by deliberately compelling our brain to repattern its neural circuitry. DRNI or deliberate, repetitive, neural information empowers the individual to proactively transform thoughts, behaviors, and perspectives, creating healthy new mindsets, skills, and abilities. It generates the chemical and hormonal neurotransmitters that improve memory and concentration. It provides GABA for relaxation, serotonin and dopamine for pleasure and motivation, and endorphins for euphoria; it decreases the transmission of the fear and anxiety-provoking hormones, cortisol and adrenaline. Neurotransmitters assist in motivating and supporting recovery. Proactive neuroplasticity through DRNI is the most potent and effective means of learning and unlearning.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT).  Social anxiety stems from negative, irrational thinking and behavior caused by ingrained reactions to situations and conditions. CBT trains the individual to recognize these automatic negative thoughts and behaviors (ANTs), replacing them with healthy rational ones (ARTs) until they become automatic and permanent. The behavioral component of CBT involves activities that reinforce the process. CBT is structured, goal-oriented, and focused on the present and the solution. 

Positive Psychology emphasizes the positive while managing and processing the negative to achieve optimal functioning. PP focuses on the character strengths, virtues, and attributes that help the individual transform and flourish. Positive Psychology’s mental health interventions have proved successful in mitigating the symptoms of depression, anxiety, and other self-destructive patterns. Growing research shows that PP interventions produce significant improvements in emotional wellbeing while decreasing symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Self-Esteem Recovery and Revitalization is achieved through a series of clinically proven exercises to help the individual rediscover and reinvigorate the self-esteem disenabled by childhood experience, the onset of dysfunction, and the subsequent disruption in natural human development.

The ultimate objectives of a Recovery Group are:

  • To provide the tools and techniques to replace years of toxic thoughts and behaviors with rational, healthy ones, dramatically alleviating the self-destructive symptoms of anxiety, depression, and other dysfunctions
  • To compel the rediscovery and reinvigoration of the individual’s character strengths, virtues, and attributes.
  • To design a targeted behavioral modification process to help the individual re-engage their social comfort and status.
  • To provide the individual the means to control their dysfunction, rather than allowing it to control them.

The main components utilized in our Recovery Group include psycho-education, cognitive comprehension, roleplay, exposure, and homework.

Psycho-Education involves teaching individuals about the relationship between thoughts, emotions, and physiological reactions. Complementarity is the inherent cooperation of our human system components in maintaining physiological equilibrium. It is mind, body, spirit, and emotions working in concert. This cooperation extends to our emotions, i.e., the complementarity of anger, laugher, pride, sadness, etc. Sustainability of our dysfunction as well as efforts to recover require and engage simultaneous mutual interaction.

Cognitive Comprehension involves correcting negative or inaccurate cognitions by identifying distorted thoughts and developing rational replies. It is based on the premise that dysfunction compels individuals to avoid the reality of their symptomatic negative self-image and beliefs, generating inaccurate, biased processing while in social situations.

Roleplay is geared towards addressing fear and anxiety-provoking situations specific to the individual. Participants act out various social roles in dramatic situations that, through comprehension and repetition, compel a change in attitudes and engage different ways of coping with stresses and conflicts.

Exposure is designed to elicit the individual’s fears, allowing them to recognize they are irrational and unfounded. In imaginal exposure, the individual is asked to visualize and describe the feared stimulus. By logically addressing it and utilizing techniques like the vertical arrow, they experience a decrease in anxiety over time. In vivo exposure allows the individual to confront feared stimuli in real-world conditions.

Homework is designed to help the individual identify distorted thoughts when they occur naturally and consists of exercises individuals that encourage self-evaluation that leads to rediscovery and recognition of worth and potential. Because the participants experience different degrees of social anxiety and different social triggers, the homework assignments are geared and designed towards individual responses which are confidentially addressed and developed between the participant and facilitator. 

Positive Personal Affirmations
Character Resume
Diversions
Plan for Exposure Situation
Vertical Arrow Technique
Shame, Blame, and Guilt
Persona
Complementarity
Positive Autobiography

Deliberate conversations
Affirmative Visualization
Slow-talk, slow thinking
Cognitive Distortions
Negative, pressure, conditional words
ANTs (automatic negative thoughts)
Moderating Exposure Situations
Coping skills
Others TBD

These are active, structured Recovery Groups for people who are willing and motivated to address the symptoms of their dysfunction. This means we can only work with self-motivated and committed individuals. We cannot accept people or continue to support them unless they are willing to participate in the discussions and exercises. While progress is exponential, goals are not met overnight. Recovery is a lifelong work-in-progress.

On-site workshops will resume post-pandemic. Individual short and long-term recovery support is also available to a select few. 

For further information or to request an interview, please fill out the following form.

Testimonials

Michael Z. – “I have lived with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) for as long as I can remember. It has overwhelmed me many times throughout my life, especially in avoiding crowds of people such as meet ‘n greets, conferences, picnics in the park, etc. I have always made the excuse that I cannot attend an event because my SAD would go into overdrive, fearing the upcoming event, always feeling “less” than others that will be there. Especially if my brain thinks the event will be “clicky.”

Our recovery group focuses on neuroplasticity (reprogramming the brain). The work brings up a lot of SAD feelings about the past and present. There are several straightforward assignments to complete while in recovery. It’s amazing what feelings come up when I’m assigned these exercises. I’ve learned:

  • My SAD does not rule me nor is it my fault that I have it.
  • How to transform any SAD negative thoughts into nurturing myself through daily affirmations

I feel more confident about attending a social gathering. Sure, I still have SAD, but now I have a plan how I can attend an event and feel more comfortable mingling with others. I like Robert’s SAD recovery program, especially how it’s taking many of my negative thoughts away and replacing them with positive ones. I also appreciate the others that are in our recovery group, as we all mingle quite well. And, of course, Robert is always there as nurturing and positive friend.”     

Matty S. – “It doesn’t come easy. Having the tools is just the start. Really understanding them all is still a challenge and the constant, long-term repetitiveness of DRNI is brutal. I’m not perfect by any means and I fall back a lot. I remember you said to consider projected failure as a process of learning, and setbacks are only possible with progress. Life is much better. I came into the program registering about a 9 out of 10 on the Richter scale of anxiety and depression. I’m now between 3 and 5 and working to get even more in control. I would give the practicum the most credit, but it taught me that I’m the captain of my ship, so I take credit and pride for hanging in there …                                                                   

Jose Garcia Silva, Ph.D.“I have never encountered such an efficient professional … His work transpires dedication, care, and love for what he does.”                                                                            

Leon V. – “I love his classes because the only pressure comes from within, not from the instructor, who clearly loves and knows what he is doing.                                                                                         

Janice Parker, Ph.D.“I am simply in awe at the writing, an individual’s insights, an individual’s deep knowing of transcendence, an individual’s intuitive understanding of psychic-physical pain, an individual’s connection of the pain to healing, an individual’s concept/title, and above all, an individual’s innate compassion …”                                                             

David C – “I’ve been unhappy and angry for as long as I can remember.  I hated my life and I was unhappy at work. I didn’t have anyone to confide in. When you kept pushing that cognitive stuff I was ready to walk, but you persuaded me that that was my social anxiety looking for an excuse to quit on myself. I don’t do as much of the positive repetitions as I should, but I do see the light at the end of the tunnel and that’s something I didn’t have before you. As far as I concerned, that pretty much says it all.”              

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to the research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over the individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

Social Anxiety Disorder in the LGBTQ+ Community

I’m pleased to announce my new four-part course for Academia.edu: Social Anxiety Disorder in the LGBTQ+ Community.

The course explores the pervasiveness of social anxiety in the LGBT community and how it disrupts the ability to establish and maintain healthy relationships.

An estimated one in four U.S. adults and adolescents have diagnosable depression and anxiety. The LBGT community is twice as likely to be impacted as their counterparts. LGBT adolescents are almost five times as likely to attempt suicide, and 40% of transgender adults have attempted suicide in their lifetime.

Roughly one/third of LGBT persons have social anxiety disorder. Their avoidance of social situations is aggravated by the unwillingness to disclosure or seek treatment due to the stigma of diagnosis, public opinion, victimization, family rejection, homophobia, heterosexism, and identity. 

This course illustrates how social anxiety impacts healthy relationships, how the problem is exacerbated in the LGBT community, and what can be done to address the issue. The innate desire-to love and be loved is no less dynamic than any other group, but the fear and anxiety of intimacy and companionship impedes the ability to establish and maintain sustainable social connectedness. 

  • Session 1: The prevalence of social anxiety disorder in the LGBTQ+ community.
  • Session 2: Victimization, heterosexism, and homophobia in the LGBTQ+ Community.
  • Session 3: Social anxiety’s disruptive impact on healthy relationships.
  • Session 4: A paradigmatic approach to recovery utilizing proactive neuroplasticity.

Neuroscience and Happiness: Neuroplasticity and Positive Behavioral Change

Neuroplasticity is the scientific evidence of our brain’s adaptation to learning. By deliberately enhancing the process, we can proactively transform our thoughts, behaviors, and perspectives, creating healthy new mindsets, skills, and abilities. All experience notifies our neural pathways to restructure, generating a correlated change in behavior and perspective. This course demonstrates how information creates the electrical activity that restructures our neural network. The deliberate, repetitive neural input of information strengthens and solidifies the connections between neurons, dramatically accelerating and solidifying learning through synaptic neurotransmission.

  • Session 1: The evolution of proactive neuroplasticity and its impact on our behavior.
  • Session 2: The proactive application of neuroplasticity; how it empowers change.
  • Session 3: The neural trajectory of information and how it accelerates and strengthens learning.
  • Session 4: Psychological approaches that help us construct our neural information.

MY EXPERIENCE OF A RECHANNLING PRACTICUM A graduate of the 10-hour ReChanneling practicum has created a website partially dedicated to his experiences. He is halfway through the five-week, 10-hour session, sharing his reactions, thoughts, and perspectives in separate posts for each hour of the practicum and including the 4 weekly post-session work-at-home. LINK

ENLISITNG POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGIES TO CHALLENGE LOVE WITHIN SAD’S CULTURE OF MALADAPTIVE SELF-BELIEFS in Claude-Helene Mayer,  Elisabeth Vanderheiden (Eds.) International Handbook of Love Transcultural and Transdisciplinary Perspectives available at Amazon and other fine booksellers.

How an Honorable Psychobiography Embraces the Fluidity of Truth in New Trends in Psychobiography, Chap. 5 (pp: 79-95). Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-16953-4-https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-030-16953-4

Revisiting your inherent character strengths, virtues, and attributes that generate the motivation and perseverance to attain your aspirations.

Establishing a Wellness Model for LGBTQ+ Persons with Anxiety and Depression. Academia.edu, Researchgate.com. doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17550.38728 (PDF) Establishing a Wellness Model for LGBTQ+ Persons with a Mental Dysfunction (researchgate.net)

The wellness model’s emphasis on character strengths, virtues, and attributes not only positively impacts the self-beliefs and image of a mentally ill person but resonates in sexual and gender-based identities and portends well, the recovery-remission of an LGBTQ+ person

Proactive Neuroplasticity and Positive Behavioral Change

This is a general overview of Dr. Mullen’s Academa.edu course “Neuroscience and Happiness. Neuroplasticity and Positive Behavioral Change.”

Neuroplasticity is the scientific evidence of our brain’s constant adaptation to information. Scientists refer to the process as structural remodeling of the brain. It’s what makes learning and registering new experiences possible. All information notifies our neural pathways to restructure, generating a correlated change in behavior and perspective. 

What is significant is our ability to dramatically accelerate learning by deliberately compelling our brain to repattern its neural circuitry. DRNI or deliberate, repetitive neural information empowers us to proactively transform our thoughts, behaviors, and perspectives, creating healthy new mindsets, skills, and abilities. 

Thanks to advances in technology, researchers can get a never-before-possible look at the brain’s dynamic and malleable inner mechanics.

Three forms of neuroplasticity.

Reactive neuroplasticity is our brain’s natural and indeliberate adaptation to information. We react unconsciously to sensory information and insensible experiences: music, colors, sounds, tactile impressions, phenomena. Whether it negatively or positively processes that information depends upon the content. Examples of positive reactions might be a warm bath, delightful company, a child’s laughter. An adverse reaction might be rush-hour traffic, disappointment, or a hostile gesture

Active neuroplasticity is achieved through intentional cognitive pursuits such as learning, engaging in social interaction, teaching, creating, listening to music—not just hearing it but actively listening to it. 

DRNI (deliberate, repetitive neural information) is proactive neuroplasticity—the conscious, intentional repatterning of our neural network utilizing tools and techniques developed for the process. Proactive neuroplasticity through DRNI is the most potent and effective means of learning

(1) it alleviates symptoms of ‘mental’ disorders and general discomforts that impact our emotional wellbeing and quality of life. A regimen of DRNI can compensate for and overwhelm decades of irrational and harmful thoughts and behaviors.

(2) The calculated regimen of repetitive neural input accelerates and consolidates learning. It supports personal goals and objectives—eliminating a bad habit, self-transformation—harnessing our intrinsic aptitude for extraordinary living. 

Recovering from physiological dysfunction and discomfort and achieving motivating personal concerns are facilitated through the same process of DRNI.

Our brain is in constant flux; it never stops realigning to new information. Connections strengthen and weaken, neurons atrophy and others are born, learning replaces unlearning, chemical and electrical energy dissipates and expands, functions shift from one region to another. Proactively stimulating our brain with deliberate, repetitive neural information accelerates and consolidates the process; there is a correlated change in thought, behavior, and perspective, becoming habitual and spontaneous over time.  

Each neural input of information causes a receptor neuron to fire, transmitting chemical and electrical energy, neuron to neuron throughout the nervous system. DRNI expedites the process. Multiple positive DRNI, such as a series of positive personal affirmations (PPAs), cause multiple receptor neurons to fire, dramatically amplifying learning through synaptic neurotransmission. 

Hormonal and chemical neurotransmitters

Our brain rewards us with chemical and hormonal neurotransmissions: GABA for relaxation, serotonin and dopamine for pleasure and motivation, endorphins for euphoria. In addition, it supplies us with chemicals and hormones that facilitate learning, memory, and concentration. 

Life can be difficult; many of us are unsatisfied, unhappy, and nonproductive. When that information filters into our neural system, our neurotransmitters support that negativity. That’s why it’s so hard to break a bad habit and recovery difficult. Conversely, every time we provide positive input, our brain releases those same chemicals and hormones, generating feelings of self-worth and healthy productivity. It generates the motivation, persistence, and perseverance to achieve our potential.

Our brain is an organic reciprocator.

Our human brain does not think; it is an organic reciprocator that allows us to think. Its job is to provide the chemical and electrical maintenance that supports our vital functions: heartbeat, nervous system, and blood–flow. Neural messages tell us when to breathe, stimulate thirst, control our weight and digestion. Our brain does not differentiate rational from irrational thinking, healthy from toxic behaviors. Instead, it reacts to the positive or negative energy of the information. 

Universal abundance

Our brain codes the health or toxicity of information into negative or positive electrical energy. That energy, duplicated by millions of participating neurons, is reciprocated in abundance because a single neuron receptor ultimately engages millions of participating neurons, each with its energy transmissions. Our human brain contains 86 billion nerve cells or neurons arranged in pathways or networks based on that electrical activity. The reciprocating energy from DRNI is vastly more abundant because of the repeated firing of the neuron receptor. Positive energy in, positive energy multiplied millions of times, positive energy reciprocated in abundance. 

Trajectory of Information

Neurons are the core components of our brain and our central nervous system. Inside each neuron is electrical activity. Information stimulates or excites a receptor neuron which fires, stimulating a presynaptic or sensory neuron via an axon or connecting pathway. Sensory neurons transmit the information to the synapse at the junction of the postsynaptic cell or relay neuron. The synapse permits the neurons to interact. The neuron’s hairlike tendrils (dendrites) pick up the synaptic signal and forward that information to the soma or nucleus of the cell body. Continuous electrical and chemical energy impulses engage millions of participating neurons, which transmit the electrical energy to millions of other neurons in multiple interconnected areas of our brain. Finally, the electrical energy converts back into information relayed by the motor neuron to its appropriate destination–our ears, bladder, muscles, and so on. Cognitive information is compartmentalized into the areas of the brain associated with the distinctly human traits of higher thought, language, and human consciousness.

Every input of information, intentional or otherwise, causes a receptor neuron to fire. Each time a neuron fires, it strengthens the axon connection and the neural bond. DRNI expedites the process through deliberate repetition. An increase in learning efficacy arises from the sensory neuron’s repeated and persistent stimulation of the postsynaptic cell. Multiple firings dramatically accelerate and consolidate learning. In addition, DRNI activates long-term potentiation, which increases the strength of the nerve impulses along the connecting pathways, generating more energy. BDNF or brain-derived neurotrophic factors are proteins that neurons need for survival. Deliberate, repetitive neural information generates higher levels of BDNF, which is associated with improved cognitive functioning, mental health, and memory. 

Recovery from dysfunction and discomfort.

Combined statistics show that 89% of neuroses onset at adolescence or earlier. In the rare event conditions like PTSD or clinical narcissism begin later in life, susceptibility originates in childhood as a consequence of childhood physical, emotional, or sexual disturbance(s). Our self- esteem and image develop during childhood, modify by experience, and help form the foundation of our personality. We are who we are because of our core beliefs and the accumulation of our experiences. Since its onset, our dysfunction or discomfort has been feeding our brain irrational thoughts and behaviors. Irrational is anything detrimental to our emotional wellbeing and quality of life.

Simply put, it is not logical or reasonable to cause ourselves harm. These irrational thoughts and behaviors compel us to feed our brains harmful and self-destructive information. The purpose of DRNI is to replace those perceptions of undesirability and unworthiness generated by our childhood disturbance(s). 

Motivating personal concerns

The alternative utilization of DRNI is motivating personal concerns—improving life satisfaction, transforming ourselves, becoming the best that we can be. We all know how difficult it is to change, remove ourselves from hostile environments, and break harmful habits that interfere with optimum functioning. We’re physiologically hard-wired to resist anything that disrupts our equilibrium. Our inertia senses and repels changes, and our brain’s basal ganglia resist any modification in behavior patterns. DRNI empowers us to assume accountability for our emotional wellbeing, productivity, and quality of life, by proactively controlling information input.

Hebbian Learning

Hebbian learning describes how neurons learn by responding to information. Hebb’s rule of neuroplasticity states, neurons that fire together wire together. In other words, the more neurons communicate with one another, the stronger the connection. When multiple neurons wire together, they create more receptor and sensory neurons. Repeated firing strengthens and solidifies the pathways between neurons. Synaptic connections consolidate when two or more neurons are activated contiguously. The more repetitions, the quicker and more robust the new connection. The activity of the axon pathway is heightened, urging the synapses to increase and accelerate the release of chemicals and hormones. Conscious repetition of information correlates to more robust learning and unlearning.

An Example Utilizing Social Anxiety Disorder

We are physiologically acclimated to our condition. It has been developing within us since childhood. This is why it is challenging to establish new habits or change our self-image and outlook. Let us use the example of someone with social anxiety disorder. The predominant symptom of SAD is intense apprehension of social interaction—the fear of being judged, negatively evaluated and ridiculed. This causes persistent, pathological anxiety in everyday situations such as dating, interviewing for a position, even answering a question in class. 

Because our brain does not differentiate healthy from toxic information, each time a SAD person avoids a social situation or alienates someone out of fear of rejection, she or he is chemically and hormonally compensated. Self-destructive behaviors are rewarded with GABA for relaxation, dopamine for pleasure and motivation, endorphins for euphoria, and serotonin for a sense of wellbeing. We receive acetylcholine for our negativity, glutamate to support our selective memory, and noradrenaline to meddle with our concentration. Our brain says good job. Here is some more encouragement for your irrational behavior. 

Our neural network naturally adapts and restructures to information, whether reactive to unconscious experience or actively generated by our compulsion to engage and learn. Logic dictates that if our neural network learns from information, its deliberate, repetitive neural input enhances the process. If information naturally strengthens and consolidates neural connections to accelerate learning, then repetition dramatically expedites the process. 

Positive personal affirmations

Positive personal affirmations are rational, reasonable, possible, goal-focused, and first-person present time. Rational because the objective is subverting irrationality. Remember, it is illogical and unreasonable to cause ourselves harm. PPAs are fair and sensible reflections of our aspirations and intentions. The end goal must be possible, or the effort is counter-productive and futile. Goal-focused is self-explanatory; if we do not know our destination, our path will be purposeless meandering. We learn from the experiences, but we do not control them. First-person, present time affirms we are dealing with the here-and-now; DRNI is here-and-now activity. Brevity is also essential. PPAs should be unconditional and to the point. The information at the core of DRNI is calculated and specific to intention. Are we challenging the negative thoughts and behaviors of our dysfunction? Are we reaffirming the character strengths that generate the motivation and perseverance to accomplish? What is our end goal? What is the personal milestone we desire to achieve? The crucial element of DRNI is the content of the intention behind the information. The strength of the message correlates to its durability and learning efficacy. 

So, what is the content of deliberate, repetitive neural information, how is it constructed, and what materials are helpful to its construction?  CBT, positive psychology and other positive approaches collaboratively work to develop the specific, intention-driven content of the positive personal affirmations at the core of DRNI.  

As light is the absence of darkness, so positive is the absence of negativity. Cognitive-behavioral therapy’s overarching objective is to replace irrational and unhealthy thoughts and behaviors with productive and emotionally affirming ones. 

As our understanding of behavioral neuroplasticity evolved, it became clear that the practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy produces changes in human brain activity. Further studies revealed that an effective way to counter the negativity generated by our dysfunction or discomfort is through the cognitive aspect of CBT, the deliberate, repetitious input of positive information. Over time and through repetition, new thoughts and behaviors become habitual and spontaneous. Studies of CBT have shown it to be an effective treatment for various mental illnesses, including depression, social anxiety, generalized anxiety, panic, bipolar and eating disorders, PTSD, OCD, and schizophrenia. CBT’s mechanisms of change are formidable tools in behavioral modification when utilizing repetitive cognitive reinforcement in concert with other approaches. The behavioral aspect supports the process Positive personal affirmations, embraced by us for centuries, are the cognitive aspect of CBT.

Positive psychology is the most viable adjunct to cognitive-behavioral therapy in the processing of DRNI. Although the program functions best in conjunction with other approaches, its focus on the positive aspects of human development and achievement not only improves our self-image and perspectives but greatly enhances overall psychological and physiological health. 

Positive psychology describes motivating personal concerns and recovery as people determining their potential and purpose by constructing and reclaiming a valued and welcoming identity. Its emphasis is on recognizing and regenerating our inherent character strengths, virtues, and attributes, which underscore our creativity, optimism, resilience, empathy, compassion, humor, and life satisfaction. It facilitates this through mindfulness, autobiography, positive writing, gratitude, forgiveness, kindness, and other self-affirming techniques. The overarching objective of positive psychology is to identify our inherent assets and capabilities to achieve our potential to become the best that we can be.

Accepting scientific validity to approaches that support DRNI encourages us to control our dysfunction or discomfort and achieve our motivating personal concerns. Achieving recovery and motivating personal concerns are not overnight achievables, however. The process is simple in theory but challenging due to the commitment and endurance required for the long-term, repetitive process of proactive neuroplasticity. We do not put on tennis shorts and advance to Wimbledon without decades of practice with racket and balls; philharmonics cater to pianists who have spent some time at the keyboard. DRNI requires a calculated regimen of deliberate, repetitive neural information. We can have all the tools we require, but they need to come out of the shed. Not only is DRNI repetitious and tedious, but it also fails to deliver immediate tangible results, causing us to readily concede defeat and abandon hope in this era of instant gratification. 

Recommended Practice: Repeat three positive personal affirmations a minimum of 5 times daily. That is about five minutes of your time. 

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to the research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over the individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.

Love, Friendship, and Social Anxiety

Social Anxiety in the LGBTQ+ Community

A four-part course presented by Academia.edu. ACCESS HEREhttps://www.academia.edu/courses/g1Vx7r?tab=0&v=bRg33E

Roughly one/third of LGBTQ persons have social anxiety disorder which severely disrupts the ability to establish and maintain healthy relationships. The symptomatic avoidance of social situations is aggravated by the resistance to disclose or seek treatment due to the stigma of diagnosis, public opinion, victimization, family rejection, homophobia, heterosexism, and identity. The innate desire-to love and be loved is no less dynamic than any other group, but the fear and anxiety of intimacy and connectedness impede the ability to establish and maintain sustainable social connectedness. 

  • Session 1: The prevalence of social anxiety disorder in the LGBTQ community
  • Session 2: The social impact of victimization, heterosexism, homophobia, and identity
  • Session 3: SAD ‘s disruptive impact on healthy relationships
  • Session 4: The paradigmatic recovery approach of proactive neuroplasticity

Neuroscience and Happiness: A Guide to Neuroplasticity and Positive Behavioral Change

A four-part course presented by Academia.edu. ACCESS HERE.

Neuroplasticity is the scientific evidence of our brain’s adaptation to learning. By deliberately enhancing the process, we can proactively transform our thoughts, behaviors, and perspectives, creating healthy new mindsets, skills, and abilities. All experience notifies our neural pathways to restructure, generating a correlated change in behavior and perspective. This course demonstrates how information creates the electrical activity that restructures our neural network. The deliberate, repetitive neural input of information strengthens and solidifies the connections between neurons, dramatically accelerating and solidifying learning through synaptic neurotransmission.

  • Session 1: The evolution of proactive neuroplasticity and its impact on our behavior.
  • Session 2: The proactive application of neuroplasticity; how it empowers change.
  • Session 3: The neural trajectory of information and how it accelerates and strengthens learning.
  • Session 4: Psychological approaches that help us construct our neural information.

Broadening the Parameters of the  Psychobiography. The Character Motivations of the ‘Ordinary’ Extraordinary. In Psychobiographical Illustrations on Meaning and Identity in Sociocultural Contexts, 2021-22 from Springer

For over a century, psychobiography has focused on the eminent individual who has achieved historical or social recognition. Ignoring the character strengths of the ‘ordinary’ individual who has reached a significant and noteworthy persona milestone is a disservice to psychology and those who might benefit from its research. The psychological benefits seem apparent if consideration of the character strengths and virtues of the ordinary extraordinary supplement psychobiographic research. Their motivations are no less extraordinary or worthy of consideration than those of the accomplished individual who has achieved historical or social recognition; each complements psychology research both generally and topically.

Enlisting Positive Psychologies to Challenge Love within SAD’s Culture of Maladaptive Self-Beliefs in C.-E. Mayer, E. Vanderheiden (eds.) International Handbook of Love: Transcultural and Transdisciplinary Perspectives. Insight into the relationship deficits experienced by people with SAD. Their innate need-for-intimacy is no less dynamic than that of any individual, but their impairment disrupts the ability (means-of-acquisition) to establish affectional bonds in almost any capacity. Now available from Amazon and other fine booksellers. The prepublication draft can be accessed here.

How an Honorable Psychobiography Embraces the Fluidity of Truth in New Trends in Psychobiography, Chap. 5 (pp: 79-95). Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-16953-4-

Rediscovering and appreciating your inherent character strengths, virtues, and attributes that generate the motivation and perseverance to succeed.

The Art of Authenticity: Constantin Stanislavski and Merleau-PontyJournal of Literature and Art Studies, 6 (7):790-803 (2016). doi:10.17265/2159-5836/2016.07.010. 

Utilizing Stanislavski’s method for authentic stage acting to address our volatile emotions to deconstruct and better understand and control them. 

Establishing a Wellness Model for LGBTQ+ Persons with Anxiety and Depression. Academia.edu, Researchgate.com. doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.17550.38728

The wellness model’s emphasis on character strengths, virtues, and attributes not only positively impacts the self-beliefs and image of a mentally ill person but resonates in sexual and gender-based identities and portends well, the recovery-remission of an LGBTQ+ person.

Holy Stigmata, Anorexia, and Self-Mutilation: Parallels in Pain and Imagining. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies, 9:25, 2010.   

Addresses the types of personalities that engage in self-mutilation and how some manipulate their self-inflicted pain for healing and empowerment.

Additional Publications

(2020) A Wellness Model of Recovery-Remission from Mental Illness in the 21st Century. Academia.edu, Researchgate.com. doi:10.13140/RG.2.2.13413.22244

(2018) Debunking the Origins of Morality; the Individual’s Commitment to Humanity, Academia.edu.

(2018) Aurobindo’s Supermind, Teilhard’s Omega Point & Plato’s Doctrine of Recollection, Academia.edu.

(2014) Evolutionary Panentheism and Metanormal Human Capacity.  California Institute of Integral Studies, 2014, 355; 3680241. https://www.scribd.com/document/348881976/..

(2012) Aristotle and the Natural Slave: The Athenian Relationship with India, Mithras Reader Vol III: An Academic and Religious Journal of Greek, Roman and Persian Studies.

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to the research and development of methods to alleviate symptoms of physiological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over the individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for groups, workshops, and practicums.