Tag Archives: LGBTQ

Neural Restructuring, CBT, and Positive Affirmations

When we restructure our neural pathways, there is a correlated change in our behavior and perspective.

Neural Plasticity

  • Our brain contains hundreds-of-billions of nerve cells (neurons) arranged in networks.
  • When neural pathways reshape, there is a correlated change in behavior and perspective.
  • Our brain is not a moral adjudicator, but an organic reciprocator. It adapts and correlates to stimuli.
  • Anything destructive to our well-being is irrational and unhealthy.
  • Our brain does differentiate between rational and irrational. Its job is to provide the chemical and electrical maintenance that maintain our vital functions: heartbeat, nervous system, and blood–flow. It tells us when to breathe. It generates our mood, controls our weight and digestion, and so on.
  • A stimulus occurs at every experience: a muscle twitch, a decision, a memory, emotion, reaction, noise, the prick of a needle.
  • Every stimulus causes the receptive neuron to fire, transmitting a message, passed from neuron to neuron until it reaches its destination.
  • Plasticity is the brain’s capacity to change with learning. Learning is a component of everything that happens to a person; it is comprised of infinitesimal moments of experience. Studies in brain plasticity evidence the brain’s ability to change at any age.
  • Our psychological dysfunction or discomfort generates and is sustained by our irrational thoughts and behaviors, impelling us to feed our brain unhealthy stimuli.
  • Our brain is always learning at an accelerated rate. What has been learned can be unlearned. Unhealthy beliefs and behaviors are unlearned, as our brain learns new beliefs and behaviors.
  • The function of cognitive-behavioral restructuring is to supplant irrational thoughts and actions with rational ones. This causes the neural network to restructure. Over time and through repetition, these new thoughts and behaviors become habitual and spontaneous.
  • Deliberate repetitious stimuli compel neurons to fire repeatedly causing them to wire together. The more repetitions the quicker and stronger the new connection.

90% of treatment programs feature cognitive-behavioral therapy. The cognitive aspect is positive affirmations. Practicing repetitive positive affirmations increases activity in the self-processing systems of the cortex, which counteract the negative input that threatens self-esteem. The brain automatically responds by transmitting the hormones that sustain us and provide comfort and pleasure. The more input of positive affirmations, the more our brain responds. These constant feelings of comfort and pleasure then motivate us to continue the repetitive practice of self-affirmations. Positive affirmations must be rational, reasonable, possible, and first-person present time.

Our brains consist of hundreds-of-billions of nerve cells (neurons) arranged in pathways or networks. Inside each of these neurons, there is electrical activity. Neurons are the core components of our brain and our central nervous system. Our functionality is facilitated by a hugely complex system of synapses, axons, and dendrites working in collaboration with our nerve cells.

Every stimulus we experience causes a receptive neuron to fire, transmitting a message from neuron to neuron until it generates a reaction. A stimulus occurs at every experience: a muscle movement, a decision, a memory, emotion, reaction, noise, the prick of a needle, a twitch. Because of our dysfunction, our brain has structured itself around unhealthy feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. It sustains this irrationality by naturally releasing pleasurable chemicals (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine). It does not know any better; it responds to our input. 

It’s estimated that humans have up to 60,000 thoughts a day. Whenever you provide negative input, your brain releases chemicals that make you feel bad. Conversely, every time you provide positive input, your brain releases chemicals that make you feel good.

Science confirms our neural pathways are constantly realigning. Since its onset (adolescence), our dysfunction or discomfort has been feeding our brain irrational thoughts and behaviors. What is irrational? Irrational is anything detrimental to our emotional wellbeing and quality of life. Simply put, it is irrational to hurt ourselves. 

Our brain cannot differentiate between rational and irrational. It does not think; it provides the means for us to think. It is an organic reciprocator. Its job is to provide the chemical and electrical stimulants that maintain heartbeat, nervous system, and blood–flow. They tell us when to breathe, stimulate thirst, control our weight and digestion. They establish and affect our behavior, moods, memories, and so on. 

Neural restructuring is our brain’s capacity to change with learn­ing; functions performed by our neurotransmitters are learning functions. Our neurons don’t act by themselves but through neural circuits. These circuits strengthen or weaken their connections based on chemical and electrical activity. This process is called Hebbian learning, and this is important. Our brain learns at an incredibly accelerated rate, and what has been learned can be unlearned. The purpose of neural restructuring is to replace irrational thoughts and behaviors with healthy ones. Our beliefs and concepts, thoughts, and actions have been learned and practiced from early on. We are conditioned to them. As our brain reciprocates our positive input, our neural network restructures itself accordingly. Over time, through deliberate repetition, healthy, rational thoughts and behaviors become habitual and spontaneous. Why the repetition? When our neurons fire repeatedly, they wire together. The more repetitions. the quicker and stronger the new connection.

fAn essential element in subverting our dysfunction or discomfort is the deliberate restructuring of our neural network.

Why is your support essential? ReChanneling is dedicated to research and development of methods to mitigate symptoms of psychological dysfunction and discomfort. Our vision is to reshape the current pathographic emphasis on diagnoses over individual, which fosters a deficit, disease model of human behavior. Treatment programs must disavow ineffective, one-size-fits-all approaches and target the individual personality through communication, empathy, collaboration, and an integration of historically and clinically practical methods. All donations support scholarships for workshops and practicums.